Dynamics in the international reception of the Reformation

Although the start of Luther’s Reformation movement can be linked to a restricted area, Reformation soon became an international phenomenon.

Not only were Luther’s writings spread to other regions, his ideas were also connected with existing forms of spirituality, scholarship, and protests against the Church. His ideas were transformed, tempered, and radicalized. Furthermore, the general scholarly interest in ancient sources was paralleled by the Christian interest in Biblical and Jewish sources. All these movements influenced one another.

In the international symposium ‘Dynamics in the international reception of the Reformation’ six scholars will highlight three different international dynamics of the (early) Reformation period:

Program

10:00 – 10:25: Registration and coffee/tea

10:30 – 11:00: Prof. Dr. Stephen Burnett (University of Nebraska-Lincoln): ‘Luther, the Rabbis, and Biblical Understanding in “On the Jews and their Lies” (1543)’

11:00 – 11:30: Prof. Dr. Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman (VU Amsterdam): ‘Christian appreciation of Jewish commentaries in the Sixteenth Century’

11:30 – 12:00: Discussion

12:00 – 13:00: Lunch

13:00 – 13:30: Prof. Dr. Christine Kooi (Louisiana State University): ‘How Reformed was the Reformation in the Low Countries? Some contextualizations’

13:30 – 14:00: Prof. Dr. Sabine Hiebsch (Theological University Kampen): ‘Martin Luther in Early Modern Dutch Lutheranism: a liability?’

14:00 – 14:30: Discussion

14:30 – 15:00: Coffee Break

15:00 – 15:30: Prof. Dr. Amy Nelsen-Burnett (University of Nebraska-Lincoln): ‘Reframing Reformation Dissent: Erasmus and the Sacraments in the Early Reformation’

15:30 – 16:00: Prof. Dr. Erik de Boer (Theological University Kampen): ‘Reframing a Dutch Reformed Manual of Doctrine – Joannes Anastasius Veluanus and Der leken wechyser (1554). Between Lutheranism, (Anti-) Nicodemism and Remonstrantism’

16:00 – 16:30: Roundtable discussion with the six speakers, chaired by Dr. Bart Wallet (University of Amsterdam/VU University Amsterdam)

16:30: Closure and ‘symposium’